Enteralterego

the sanest days are mad

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Okay so I saw that wm3.org were still selling shirts and the money raised goes towards legal fees to get the guys exonerated and to provide any education they may want. I followed the link from their merchendise page and ended up on Zazzle, who they sell their shirts through. I bought a ‘West Memphis Free’ shirt.

Today I got an email from them stating that they wouldn’t process my order because it breaches some of their content guidelines. I looked up their policies and the closest reason I can find as to why they rejected my order was that they don’t produce shirts that ‘may cause offence or be considered controversial’. I then looked on their website and saw hundreds of shirts promoting various political movements and advocating several activist groups, a lot of which were amongst the most popular.

I sent them an email requesting an explanation and for a new order to be placed. I then asked them that if they intend to stop selling the merchandise then they should contact wm3.org and explain why, because the money from the shirts is going towards the cause they consider ‘offensive’.

What a ridiculous position to take. It seems that they only support the political and activist movements that their company affiliates with, yet they cover it up by insisting they encourage expression and freedom, but don’t want to cause offence.

It would have been a much more admirable move for their email to inform me that they don’t support the cause and therefore they wouldn’t print the shirt. They should have refused to host the shirts if it caused a problem for them, or they believed it was too controversial to provide. But they didn’t. They sent me a patronising email which praised my freedom of expression and their respect of individual rights, and then they didn’t have to courage to admit their bias.


I would have respected their decision to reject the request based on their political affiliation, had they admitted that was the reason, but instead they pulled the ‘controversial’ card and tried to justify it with a patronising email.

I can’t help feeling that wm3.org would fight for their products, or would pull them from the site and move them to another if they knew?

I guess now we await their response.

Filed under wm3.org

760 notes

theperp:

"It’s supposed to be innocent until proven guilty, but in our case it’s guilty until proven innocent"…I’m scared about what could happen if they did find me guilty.  I know they can’t, but then again they might. I just don’t like to think about that.." 

(via exoneratethewm3)

Filed under jason baldwin

1 note

have you ever met a person that breathes so loud you just want them to stop all together?

793 notes

tedbunny:

Lobotomy

The first half of the 20th century will forever be known for a series of radical and invasive physical therapies developed in Europe and North America. Since the beginning of time, world cultures have treated mentally and physically challenged individuals in different ways. During the early 1900s, the medical community began developing some bizarre treatments. Some examples include barbiturate induced deep sleep therapy, which was invented in 1920. Deep sleep therapy was a psychiatric treatment based on the use of drugs to render patients unconscious for a period of days or weeks. Needless to say, in some cases the subjects simply did not wake up from their comas. Deep sleep therapy was notoriously practiced by Harry Bailey between 1962 and 1979, in Sydney, at the Chelmsford Private Hospital.
Twenty-six patients died at Chelmsford Private Hospital during the 1960s and 1970s. Eventually, Harry Bailey was linked to the deaths of 85 patients. In 1933 and 1934, doctors began to use the drugs insulin and cardiazol for induced shock therapy. In 1935, Portuguese neurologist António Egas Moniz introduced a procedure called the leucotomy (lobotomy). The lobotomy consisted of cutting the connections to and from the prefrontal cortex, the anterior part of the frontal lobes of the brain. The procedure involved drilling holes into the patient’s head and destroying tissues surrounding the frontal lobe. Moniz conducted scientific trials and reported significant behavioral changes in patients suffering from depression, schizophrenia, panic disorders and mania.
This may have something to do with the fact that the patient was now suffering from a mental illness and brain damage. Despite general recognition of the frequent and serious side effects, the lobotomy expanded and became a mainstream procedure all over the world. In 1949, António Egas Moniz was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine. During the 1940s and 50s, most lobotomy procedures were performed in the United States, where approximately 40,000 people were lobotomized. In Great Britain, 17,000 lobotomies were performed, and in the three Nordic countries of Finland, Norway and Sweden, approximately 9,300 lobotomies were undertaken. Today, the lobotomy is extremely rare and illegal in some areas of the world.

tedbunny:

Lobotomy

The first half of the 20th century will forever be known for a series of radical and invasive physical therapies developed in Europe and North America. Since the beginning of time, world cultures have treated mentally and physically challenged individuals in different ways. During the early 1900s, the medical community began developing some bizarre treatments. Some examples include barbiturate induced deep sleep therapy, which was invented in 1920. Deep sleep therapy was a psychiatric treatment based on the use of drugs to render patients unconscious for a period of days or weeks. Needless to say, in some cases the subjects simply did not wake up from their comas. Deep sleep therapy was notoriously practiced by Harry Bailey between 1962 and 1979, in Sydney, at the Chelmsford Private Hospital.

Twenty-six patients died at Chelmsford Private Hospital during the 1960s and 1970s. Eventually, Harry Bailey was linked to the deaths of 85 patients. In 1933 and 1934, doctors began to use the drugs insulin and cardiazol for induced shock therapy. In 1935, Portuguese neurologist António Egas Moniz introduced a procedure called the leucotomy (lobotomy). The lobotomy consisted of cutting the connections to and from the prefrontal cortex, the anterior part of the frontal lobes of the brain. The procedure involved drilling holes into the patient’s head and destroying tissues surrounding the frontal lobe. Moniz conducted scientific trials and reported significant behavioral changes in patients suffering from depression, schizophrenia, panic disorders and mania.

This may have something to do with the fact that the patient was now suffering from a mental illness and brain damage. Despite general recognition of the frequent and serious side effects, the lobotomy expanded and became a mainstream procedure all over the world. In 1949, António Egas Moniz was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine. During the 1940s and 50s, most lobotomy procedures were performed in the United States, where approximately 40,000 people were lobotomized. In Great Britain, 17,000 lobotomies were performed, and in the three Nordic countries of Finland, Norway and Sweden, approximately 9,300 lobotomies were undertaken. Today, the lobotomy is extremely rare and illegal in some areas of the world.

(Source: listverse.com)

Filed under lobotomy